ART

ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow

12/30/2014
Otto Piene Light Ballet (Light Satellite) (top) and Light Ballet (Light Drum), 1969 Chrome, glass, and light bulbs, sphere diameter: 38 cm; drum height: 45.7 cm, diameter: 124.5 cm Moeller Fine Art, New York © Otto Piene  Photo: Courtesy Moeller Fine Art, New York

Otto Piene
Light Ballet (Light Satellite) (top) and Light Ballet (Light Drum), 1969
Chrome, glass, and light bulbs, sphere diameter: 38 cm; drum height: 45.7 cm, diameter: 124.5 cm
Moeller Fine Art, New York
© Otto Piene
Photo: Courtesy Moeller Fine Art, New York

This past weekend after hibernating and eating up all the goodies and leftovers from Christmas dinner, I felt the urge to come out for fresh air and some mild cardio. The weather was surprisingly nice, it was a great weekend to be out and about. I didn’t have to go far from home to quench my artsy appetite. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is hosting an immense historical retrospective on the German artists’ group Zero (1957–66) founded by Heinz Mack and Otto Piene.The first of its kind in the United States.

Illustration from ZERO 3 (July 1961), design by Heinz Mack © Heinz Mack Photo: Heinz Mack

Illustration from ZERO 3 (July 1961), design by Heinz Mack
© Heinz Mack
Photo: Heinz Mack

“a zone of silence and of pure possibilities for a new beginning as the countdown when rockets take off” Otto Piene

Heinz Mack New York, New York, 1963 Aluminum on wood, 160 x 100 x 20 cm Private collection © Heinz Mack Photo: Heinz Mack

Heinz Mack New York, New York, 1963 Aluminum on wood, 160 x 100 x 20 cm Private collection © Heinz Mack Photo: Heinz Mack

Group ZERO began its expansion in 1961 by joining forces with artists sharing similar aesthetics and ideas from ten countries throughout Europe, Japan, North and South America.

Installation view: ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 10, 2014–January 7, 2015. Photo: David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Installation view: ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 10, 2014–January 7, 2015 Photo: David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

They all aspired to transform the Art world in the aftermath of WWII.The exhibition showcases works from over 40 artists, depicting a vast collection of art created in different mediums. The works are organized in several sub-categories located throughout the museum.

Otto Piene Venus of Willendorf (Venus von Willendorf), 1963 Oil and soot on canvas, 150 x 200 cm Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam © Otto Piene Photo: Courtesy Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Otto Piene
Venus of Willendorf (Venus von Willendorf), 1963
Oil and soot on canvas, 150 x 200 cm
Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
© Otto Piene
Photo: Courtesy Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

The fire and smoke pieces by Otto Piene were some of my favorite. They were reminiscent of Richard Pousette-Dart geometric work. I enjoyed watching Piene’s working process, it inspired me with the idea of potentially creating art pieces of my own following his techniques.

Installation view: ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 10, 2014–January 7, 2015. Photo: David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Installation view: ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 10, 2014–January 7, 2015 Photo: David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

The entire exhibition was a source of inspiration. I exited with the vision of creating art pieces using different media. A new creative way to stay busy during the new year. Normally closed on Thursdays, the museum is opening on New Year’s Day from 11 am to 6 pm to give visitors the opportunity to view ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s

ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950-60s it’s a great exhibition to help celebrate and welcome the New Year. Due to the museum’s policy on no photography, I wasn’t able to do my Art Walk in front of the camera for this post. Photos are courtesy of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

xx

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